Archive for February, 2019

Negotiating

February 18, 2019

Feb15PanelFountainBlue’s February 15 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘ Negotiating for a Win-Win’. Below are notes from the conversation.

We were fortunate to have such a spunky, amusing and seasoned panel. Although they had a wide range of educational backgrounds and professional experiences, they had much in common.

  • They are confident, strong and passionate, honest and hardworking team players. 
  • They each have a track record of success negotiating on a wide range of projects, working with a wide range of stakeholders.
  • They strive to understand objectives and perspectives and work collaboratively for a win-win whenever possible.
  • They learn from both successes and failures, from all others around them. 
  • They are persuasive leaders who know the facts and leverage the data to realize a common goal.
  • They are well-networked leaders with a hard-earned, high-impact brand.

Below are some best practices shared:

  • Know yourself well, and what’s important to you and why. Then you can negotiate best for the things that matter most to you.
  • Do your homework before the negotiation. 
    • Know what you’re willing and not willing to do and what the overarching goals are and why.
    • Research who’s involved and what their background and motivations might be. This might be done online (LinkedIn and Google are your friends) or it might be a conversation with those-in-the-know.
  • Be clear on where you can give a little and where you can’t be flexible. 
  • Bundle the issues together, rather than make it a single point of negotiation. It’s easier to manage a give-and-take from there.
  • Know your walking point. Adopt a strategy on what would happen if you reach that walking point.
  • Collaborate with your own team to strategize on how to work a negotiation. Collaborate with the other team to help ensure a win-win.
  • Play different roles (like good guy/bad guy) to help manage a negotiation.
  • Manage your emotions.
    • Don’t take things personally.
    • Take a time-out/break if things become productive.
    • If things get personally, try to re-set to a new and more social environment, like coffee on the side.
    • Be curious about the high emotions of the other party.
    • Accept and acclimate to the things that might push your buttons. 
    • Listen more than you speak.
    • Don’t insist on a resolution when emotions run high.
    • Silence is your friend.
  • Make time for in-person conversations or phone calls or videos calls.
  • Men might find it easier to negotiate on their own behalf, but women might find it easier to negotiate on behalf of someone else.

I’ll close with the input of our executives as they launched our event today – keeping being that agent of change by connecting with, engaging with, and learning from each other, in community, about everything, including how to better negotiate for a win-win. 


Please join me in thanking our gracious hosts at Western Digital and our panelists:

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue
  • Panelist Charlotte Falla, Vice President and General Counsel, Samsung Research America
  • Panelist Nancy Gilbert, Director Pilot Operations, Lam Research
  • Panelist Windi Hary, Senior Vice President Global Clinical, Quality and Regulatory Affairs, HeartFlow, Inc
  • Panelist Angela D. Roach, Executive Director, Associate General Counsel – Employment and Immigration, Maxim Integrated
  • Panelist Kristin Robinson, Director and Senior Legal Counsel, Ethics & Compliance, Western Digital

with opening remarks by Siva Sivaram, Executive Vice President, Memory Technology and Roger Crockett, Vice President, Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion, Liming Wang, VP of Finance, Manufacturing Finance and Christina Lewis, MBA, Finance Director, Devices BU at Western Digital. See bios at https://www.tikkl.com/fountainblue/c/negotiation2019.

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Evolution of Hardware

February 18, 2019

hardware

FountainBlue’s February 8 VIP roundtable was on the topic of ‘Evolution of Hardware’. Please join me in thanking our executives in attendance and our gracious hosts at Maxim. Below are notes from the conversation. 

The executives in this month’s roundtable represented decades of experience across many industry sectors – from semiconductor to healthcare, from telecommunications to networking, from automotive to manufacturing. They also represented the technical, product, management, research and marketing side of the business.

There was general agreement that hardware innovations have taken place across decades and across industries, creating an infrastructure and a foundation upon which software and integrated solutions can be built. But hardware innovations are continuing to happen, ensuring that we have the Power to make things work, that we can Communicate with others, that we have Sensors to detect what’s happening in our environment, and that we build Connections between people and things.

The Digital Age rests on the premise that this hardware foundation is solid, pervasive, reliable, expandable, and inclusive.  

Our executives in attendance were all clearly bullish on the hardware innovation opportunities ahead and agreed on the following:

  • We went from a world dependent on the right materials, and more materials. Then the emphasis became focused on control of the hardware. Then the integration of hardware and software. And now the integration of software and hardware with the cloud.
  • Hardware and software are generally integrated, and will become more so.
  • Technologies and solutions have applications across teams, across companies, across industries. Therefore, leveraging past successes might help address current challenges.
  • Complex systems will become even more so, and these systems will be integrated into other complex systems.
  • Customers are tending to stay within specific niches, yet they need partners to tackle specific elements of project challenges. When they secure that partner, they expect end-to-end, reliable, integrated hardware/software solutions.
  • Forward-thinking companies are still investing in hardware innovations. The current mindset which touts the digital and dismisses the foundational hardware and integration will soon evolve a more balanced, more considered viewpoint… once small, unexpected hardware failures cause unexpected impact.
  • In order to foster larger adoption of hardware, we need to collaborate on building our local infrastructure. Cities and counties don’t generally have the budget or talent to create that foundational infrastructure which would lead to better telecommunications, better digital access – enabling everyone living within cities to be more connected, more informed, more empowered.

Below is their advice on how to develop innovative hardware:

  • Find ways to deliver the personalized solutions customers want in a way that’s extensible and scalable and cost-productive to deliver.
  • Define technologies and processes which would make it easier to integrate hardware and software as part of the customer deliverables.
  • Balance having a versatile and elegant design addressing practical questions (can it be done, is there a demand for it) and efficient delivery and customized service.

Below are thoughts on the hardware opportunities ahead.

  • There will always be a need for more power – smaller, more reliable, less heat-emitting, more cost-effective, etc. But the power must also not give off too much heat or noise. Perhaps materials beyond copper would make the power source more sustainable.
  • It’s harder to innovate hardware for the healthcare and automotive industries because lives are at stake and policies need to be obeyed. But when these hardware innovations work, the need is great, the market is large.
  • Hearables, wearables, IoT devices will be prominent both at work and at work.  
  • Software will be integrated with hardware for customized solutions deliver real-time results, leveraging AI, ML and IoT. 
  • There are huge material science opportunities – around power generation, storage and distribution, around temperature and voltage management.
  • Packaging hardware elements will see many advances and many opportunities.
  • Customers will continue to demand personalized solutions which require customized hardware solutions, with embedded software. Forward-thinking companies will elegantly design solutions which are both versatile and practical, both personalized and scalable.

The bottom line is that hardware goes well beyond a ‘necessary evil’. It is an essential technology which is the foundation of the explosive technology advancements we’re all witnessing and benefitting from.

Working together, we can collaboratively improve the infrastructure so that we can get more done faster and more effectively.

The Leader in YOU

February 1, 2019

intelligenceopennessindustrious

At our January 13 When She Speaks event, we talked about the importance of Communicating with, then Connecting and then Engaging people. Certainly these are all actions which leaders do well. But it had me thinking, what does it take to be a leader?

  1. There are projects where you’re not involved and your leadership is not necessary. You’re not a leader there, and shouldn’t be.
  2. There are projects where you’re not involved, but your leadership would make a huge difference. Which projects might they be? What value could you bring? Is it a priority for you to actually get involved?
  3. Some say that it’s intelligence alone which makes the leader.  But I say that if you’re intelligent, yet not open to other ideas, people and viewpoints, if you’re intelligent but not willing to work hard, you’re not a leader. You’re more a ‘Prima donna‘. I mean that in the nicest way, and I want to have compassion for people who are in this category, because I’ve been guilty of being that way before as well. It’s people who think that they are right and always right and too good, smart or superior to be open and hardworking. They are people who may not want to learn a new and better way of doing something, or people who use the data to prove that their own ideas and methodology is hands-down the best way with no exceptions. The rest of us, may not be as intelligent, but we are better leaders.
  4. It’s clear that being open and curious makes one more receptive to change and therefore better learners. But being open to all change and all learnings every time, all the time is going overboard. That’s like being a flag in the wind. It’s what my friend from Colombia calls an ‘Eggplant‘ – someone who takes on the flavor of the dish, without her/his own taste. You will need to be intelligent about what to integrate and how to implement changes. You need to work hard to make sure that the change is the right one, that the change will stick.
  5. In addition, it’s great to be hardworking, but being hard-working by itself is not sufficient, unless you also have intelligence and open. Consider the ‘Worker Bee‘. They are industrious working on someone else’s plan, without much thought, and without necessarily being open to a new way of doing something. This adds great value and has its place. There are times when what you need is mostly worker bees…
  6. Now to combine the qualities above. If you’re intelligent *and* open, but not necessarily hard-working, you’re a princess. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. It feels good to be smart and open and powerful and privileged. But sometimes, you also need to be hardworking.
  7. If you’re hard-working *and* intelligent, but not open, then you’re a ‘Steward‘ – someone who has learned from many past successes and works hard to maintain these successful processes and systems. The down-side is that sometimes, these best practices no longer apply. So people must be open to new ways of doing things when change happens.
  8. If you’re open *and* hardworking, but not being intelligent, then you’re a ‘Wanna-bee‘. Again, there’s nothing wrong with being that way. You’re open to others’ ideas and plans and work hard to implement them. But sometimes you have to be intelligent and courageous enough to speak up and provide feedback and input and ideas to the current plan. Leaders reach for that bar, at the appropriate time.
  9. The Leader brings all three together – the intelligence to understand opportunities and challenges, the openness to learn and integrate new information and circumstances, and the work ethic to make something happen, despite impossible odds.
  10. Nobody is always any one thing all the time. But I hope that this post helps you understand your current mindset and the mindset of those around you. So that we can reach more strategically, more consciously to be the Leader in each of us.