Author Archive

Difficult Conversations

March 19, 2019

FountainBlue’s March 15 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘ Difficult Conversations – Bring Them On’.

We were fortunate to have such a diverse and powerful group of panelists who so succinctly and candidly shared their thoughts on how and why to conduct difficult conversations. It was also amazing to have such a strong showing of executives – male and female – representing a top-down, bottom-up support for diversity, inclusion and leadership from our host company!

We began by talking about why difficult conversations are needed, and how having a diverse population and an open leads to better business results.

But change takes time, and having those ‘difficult‘ conversations to facilitate necessary change is not an ‘easy‘ task, by definition. Below are some thoughts on how we can each find a comfortable way to have that difficult conversation:

  • There’s no magic formula for being confident and courageous. Each of our panelists had different backgrounds and upbringings, but we all had to overcome some kind of adversity at an early age. 
  • In the examples provided, it was often the case where others did nothing, yet the panelists chose to think, say or do that difficult thing. Sometimes that brought the desired result in short order. Often it did not. But regardless of the result, it was a learning and a step forward.
  • Choose to be assertive, but only when it makes sense. But be plan-ful when you make that choice as there will certainly be consequences.
  • Build a network of supporters and mentors and sponsors who will support you through easy and difficult conversations.
  • Understand the motivations and mindset of those who don’t think like you – regardless of whether there will be a difficult conversation.
  • Along those same lines, even when you think someone is very similar to you, there may at some point be a difficult conversation at some point.
  • Focus on the facts and data rather than on the feelings and emotions. 
  • With that said, with difficult conversations, emotions will likely run high – either yours or others’! So know yourself and your own buttons and triggers and proactively manage that. Know where the other party is coming from and manage from there.
  • Practice the 90-second rule – if you let someone vent emotionally for 90 seconds, they may feel heard and you may get real information to help you plan. The trick is to not get angry and defensive during the tirade.
  • Make, grow and maintain relationships before, during and after the necessary difficult conversations. 
  • Be your candid, authentic, unique self. It’s good enough.
  • Be humble and inquisitive, especially when that other person makes you feel uncomfortable.
  • Be open to a reality you didn’t consider when you adopted your current position. 

Sometimes, having a difficult conversation is not enough. Walking points include:

  • Lack of respect for the other party
  • Loss of trust between the parties
  • Mis-alignment on goals
  • Too much delta between the parties

We closed with the full topic of the conversation – Difficult Conversations – Bring Them On. For they are a necessary part of our personal growth, and the growth of our team, company and industry. Lead On!


Please join me in thanking our gracious hosts at Maxim Integrated and our panelists for FountainBlue’s March 15 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘ Difficult Conversations – Bring Them On’:

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue
  • Panelist Laura Bermudez, Senior Director of Software Engineering, Carta 
  • Panelist Rosie Cofre, Belonging and Diversity, Principal, Workday 
  • Panelist Diana Finucane, Sr. HR Business Partner, Lam Research
  • Panelist Tracy Laboy, Executive Director of HR, Maxim Integrated
  • Panelist Adriane McFetridge, Director of Engineering, Netflix
  • Panelist Lori Kate (Calise) Smith, Director, Marketing Programs, Machine Learning (ML), ARM

with opening remarks by Ed Medlin, Senior Vice President, General Counsel, Chief Compliance Officer at Maxim and closing remarks by Dino Anderson, Executive Director of L&D, D&I at Maxim.

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Open Source in the Enterprise and Open Source Business Models

March 8, 2019

OpenSource

FountainBlue’s March 8 VIP roundtable was on the topic of ‘Open Source in the Enterprise and Open Source Business Models’. Thank you also to our gracious hosts at Comcast and each of you for your input and advice. Below are notes from the conversation. 

The Open Source story is unfolding in front of us. The 80s brought us companies like HP, SUN and Silicon Graphics innovating on the Linux Operating System kernel as the first wave of commercialization. 

The 90s brought us companies such as Google and Netscape and Amazon who built sophisticated solutions on top of open source foundations to generate revenues and deliver services. 

Building on that wave of innovation, today, companies continue to leverage open source, but not just to design offerings, but also to fuel innovation. Examples include how media companies such as Comcast and Netflix are designing customized infotainment options and financial services companies such as Capital One are designed customized financial management services.

Our executives in attendance were clear that Open Source is here to stay, so the larger community needs to accept and embrace this fact, and understand how to adopt short-term and long-term strategies to integrate Open Source into business models and product and service offerings. Some of the challenges for making this happen include:

  • Definitions and terminologies around ‘Open Source’ cause confusion, especially for business leaders who misinterpret the meaning of ‘free’ and avoid open source altogether.
  • Legal and policy challenges around the use of open source code make it challenging for some companies to adopt it.
  • The requirement to ‘contribute and give back’ sometimes causes conflicts between developers who want to contribute work and code back to the network and the management who don’t want to developers to dedicate time and resource to do so because of their concerns for timelines and for IP/business reasons.

But again, accept these challenges we must, for Open Source is here to stay, and more people need to contribute to it to make it easier for more people and companies to benefit from it.

The passionate open source developers and community truly understand this dynamic. The trick is to get business people to understand it and embrace open source software while also achieving business objectives. Below is advice from the executives in attendance on how this can be accomplished.

  • Align the ‘why’ for adopting the open source strategy with the what and the how. 
  • Embrace the ‘consume, collaborate and create’ mind-set around open source. Don’t be tagged as someone who just consumes what’s there. Collaborate and connect with others, and create for the Greater Good.
  • Deliver the value-added software and services beyond the open source foundation of code. 
  • Connect with people within and outside your company and create a community of collaborators around open source. 
  • Proactively control the message your company has around open source. Make it a proactively positive and consistent message that would positively impact your brand. This means active ongoing participation with that community of Open Source activists.

Below is advice for how to grow a company beyond the non-revenue open source model to a revenue-generating company based on open source technology:

  • Package a value-add of software and services around the core technology.
  • Offer a free and a paid version with a clear value-add for the paid version.
  • Offer and monetize add-ons.
  • Ensure that everything is repeatable and scalable.
  • Go for the tall head rather than the long tail!
  • Leverage partnerships and channels where appropriate.

Consider some opportunities which leverage open source:

  • Infotainment 
  • Open Data
  • Telematics
  • Sensors
  • Open Cities
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Block Chain and Open Source

One last time – Open Source is Here to Stay! Find others who get that and know how to work with that. 

Awaken the Creative in YOU – Part One, Why?

March 1, 2019

Creative-Why

After decades and decades of rewarding that left-brained, analytical thinking, the pendulum is swinging to again embrace the creative. This is part one of a two-part post which will cover the research on why the creative will benefit people, teams and companies. Next month’s follow-on post will cover how to embrace the creative.

  1. Creative leaders outperform their peers on key financial metricsCreativity’s bottom line: How winning companies turn creativity into business value and growth, McKinsey, June 2017
  2. In one survey, creative leaders scored 16 percent higher than the average consumer-facing company on an Innovation Performance Score –  Creativity’s bottom line: How winning companies turn creativity into business value and growth, McKinsey, June 2017
  3. A McKinsey study reported that, technology upgrades would lead to a decline of 375 million employees worldwide by 2030 in positions such office support, predictable labor, and other jobs, but there will be an increase in creative jobs, teachers, care-providers and technologists. What the future of work will mean for jobs, skills, and wages, McKinsey, November 2017
  4. In another study, fifty-eight percent of survey respondents reporting high creativity had 2013 revenues exceeding their 2012 revenues by 10% or more. In contrast, only 20% of less creative companies performed similarly.  The Creative Dividend: How Creativity Impacts Business Results
  5. Of those reporting market share leadership, creative companies outnumber their less creative counterparts by a factor of 1.5.  The Creative Dividend: How Creativity Impacts Business Results
  6. In the same survey, respondents who identified their firms as ‘creative’ were three times more likely to have received national attention. The Creative Dividend: How Creativity Impacts Business Results
  7. There are four types of innovation: Incremental Innovation, Disruptive Innovation (also known as stealth innovation), Architectural Innovation, and
    Radical innovation.  Creativity helps innovators to create and sustain high risk, high reward innovations. https://info.innocentive.com/open/innovation
  8. Disruptive innovations are caused by changes in market and business phenomena, not technology advancements. It takes analysis and creativity to understand these changing business model and business phenomena. Clayton Christenson, The Innovator’s Dilemma
  9. According to neuroscientists John Kounious and Mark Beeman, insight is a product of a relaxed brain. The more we concentrate and strain for inspiration, the less likely we are to get it. It follows that the more creative and relaxed we are, the more likely we are to see an insight. The Eureka Factor: Aha Moments, Creative Insight, and the Brain, by John Kounios and Mark Beeman
  10. The four stages of idea generation according to Graham Wallis include Preparation, Incubation, Illumination, and Verification. Once you decide to do it and think about it, the clarity through creativity may come, as part of the idea generation process. The verification follows that step. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10400419.2015.1087277?journalCode=hcrj20

Next month’s post will brainstorm how to embrace the creative within yourself.

Negotiating

February 18, 2019

Feb15PanelFountainBlue’s February 15 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘ Negotiating for a Win-Win’. Below are notes from the conversation.

We were fortunate to have such a spunky, amusing and seasoned panel. Although they had a wide range of educational backgrounds and professional experiences, they had much in common.

  • They are confident, strong and passionate, honest and hardworking team players. 
  • They each have a track record of success negotiating on a wide range of projects, working with a wide range of stakeholders.
  • They strive to understand objectives and perspectives and work collaboratively for a win-win whenever possible.
  • They learn from both successes and failures, from all others around them. 
  • They are persuasive leaders who know the facts and leverage the data to realize a common goal.
  • They are well-networked leaders with a hard-earned, high-impact brand.

Below are some best practices shared:

  • Know yourself well, and what’s important to you and why. Then you can negotiate best for the things that matter most to you.
  • Do your homework before the negotiation. 
    • Know what you’re willing and not willing to do and what the overarching goals are and why.
    • Research who’s involved and what their background and motivations might be. This might be done online (LinkedIn and Google are your friends) or it might be a conversation with those-in-the-know.
  • Be clear on where you can give a little and where you can’t be flexible. 
  • Bundle the issues together, rather than make it a single point of negotiation. It’s easier to manage a give-and-take from there.
  • Know your walking point. Adopt a strategy on what would happen if you reach that walking point.
  • Collaborate with your own team to strategize on how to work a negotiation. Collaborate with the other team to help ensure a win-win.
  • Play different roles (like good guy/bad guy) to help manage a negotiation.
  • Manage your emotions.
    • Don’t take things personally.
    • Take a time-out/break if things become productive.
    • If things get personally, try to re-set to a new and more social environment, like coffee on the side.
    • Be curious about the high emotions of the other party.
    • Accept and acclimate to the things that might push your buttons. 
    • Listen more than you speak.
    • Don’t insist on a resolution when emotions run high.
    • Silence is your friend.
  • Make time for in-person conversations or phone calls or videos calls.
  • Men might find it easier to negotiate on their own behalf, but women might find it easier to negotiate on behalf of someone else.

I’ll close with the input of our executives as they launched our event today – keeping being that agent of change by connecting with, engaging with, and learning from each other, in community, about everything, including how to better negotiate for a win-win. 


Please join me in thanking our gracious hosts at Western Digital and our panelists:

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue
  • Panelist Charlotte Falla, Vice President and General Counsel, Samsung Research America
  • Panelist Nancy Gilbert, Director Pilot Operations, Lam Research
  • Panelist Windi Hary, Senior Vice President Global Clinical, Quality and Regulatory Affairs, HeartFlow, Inc
  • Panelist Angela D. Roach, Executive Director, Associate General Counsel – Employment and Immigration, Maxim Integrated
  • Panelist Kristin Robinson, Director and Senior Legal Counsel, Ethics & Compliance, Western Digital

with opening remarks by Siva Sivaram, Executive Vice President, Memory Technology and Roger Crockett, Vice President, Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion, Liming Wang, VP of Finance, Manufacturing Finance and Christina Lewis, MBA, Finance Director, Devices BU at Western Digital. See bios at https://www.tikkl.com/fountainblue/c/negotiation2019.

Evolution of Hardware

February 18, 2019

hardware

FountainBlue’s February 8 VIP roundtable was on the topic of ‘Evolution of Hardware’. Please join me in thanking our executives in attendance and our gracious hosts at Maxim. Below are notes from the conversation. 

The executives in this month’s roundtable represented decades of experience across many industry sectors – from semiconductor to healthcare, from telecommunications to networking, from automotive to manufacturing. They also represented the technical, product, management, research and marketing side of the business.

There was general agreement that hardware innovations have taken place across decades and across industries, creating an infrastructure and a foundation upon which software and integrated solutions can be built. But hardware innovations are continuing to happen, ensuring that we have the Power to make things work, that we can Communicate with others, that we have Sensors to detect what’s happening in our environment, and that we build Connections between people and things.

The Digital Age rests on the premise that this hardware foundation is solid, pervasive, reliable, expandable, and inclusive.  

Our executives in attendance were all clearly bullish on the hardware innovation opportunities ahead and agreed on the following:

  • We went from a world dependent on the right materials, and more materials. Then the emphasis became focused on control of the hardware. Then the integration of hardware and software. And now the integration of software and hardware with the cloud.
  • Hardware and software are generally integrated, and will become more so.
  • Technologies and solutions have applications across teams, across companies, across industries. Therefore, leveraging past successes might help address current challenges.
  • Complex systems will become even more so, and these systems will be integrated into other complex systems.
  • Customers are tending to stay within specific niches, yet they need partners to tackle specific elements of project challenges. When they secure that partner, they expect end-to-end, reliable, integrated hardware/software solutions.
  • Forward-thinking companies are still investing in hardware innovations. The current mindset which touts the digital and dismisses the foundational hardware and integration will soon evolve a more balanced, more considered viewpoint… once small, unexpected hardware failures cause unexpected impact.
  • In order to foster larger adoption of hardware, we need to collaborate on building our local infrastructure. Cities and counties don’t generally have the budget or talent to create that foundational infrastructure which would lead to better telecommunications, better digital access – enabling everyone living within cities to be more connected, more informed, more empowered.

Below is their advice on how to develop innovative hardware:

  • Find ways to deliver the personalized solutions customers want in a way that’s extensible and scalable and cost-productive to deliver.
  • Define technologies and processes which would make it easier to integrate hardware and software as part of the customer deliverables.
  • Balance having a versatile and elegant design addressing practical questions (can it be done, is there a demand for it) and efficient delivery and customized service.

Below are thoughts on the hardware opportunities ahead.

  • There will always be a need for more power – smaller, more reliable, less heat-emitting, more cost-effective, etc. But the power must also not give off too much heat or noise. Perhaps materials beyond copper would make the power source more sustainable.
  • It’s harder to innovate hardware for the healthcare and automotive industries because lives are at stake and policies need to be obeyed. But when these hardware innovations work, the need is great, the market is large.
  • Hearables, wearables, IoT devices will be prominent both at work and at work.  
  • Software will be integrated with hardware for customized solutions deliver real-time results, leveraging AI, ML and IoT. 
  • There are huge material science opportunities – around power generation, storage and distribution, around temperature and voltage management.
  • Packaging hardware elements will see many advances and many opportunities.
  • Customers will continue to demand personalized solutions which require customized hardware solutions, with embedded software. Forward-thinking companies will elegantly design solutions which are both versatile and practical, both personalized and scalable.

The bottom line is that hardware goes well beyond a ‘necessary evil’. It is an essential technology which is the foundation of the explosive technology advancements we’re all witnessing and benefitting from.

Working together, we can collaboratively improve the infrastructure so that we can get more done faster and more effectively.

The Leader in YOU

February 1, 2019

intelligenceopennessindustrious

At our January 13 When She Speaks event, we talked about the importance of Communicating with, then Connecting and then Engaging people. Certainly these are all actions which leaders do well. But it had me thinking, what does it take to be a leader?

  1. There are projects where you’re not involved and your leadership is not necessary. You’re not a leader there, and shouldn’t be.
  2. There are projects where you’re not involved, but your leadership would make a huge difference. Which projects might they be? What value could you bring? Is it a priority for you to actually get involved?
  3. Some say that it’s intelligence alone which makes the leader.  But I say that if you’re intelligent, yet not open to other ideas, people and viewpoints, if you’re intelligent but not willing to work hard, you’re not a leader. You’re more a ‘Prima donna‘. I mean that in the nicest way, and I want to have compassion for people who are in this category, because I’ve been guilty of being that way before as well. It’s people who think that they are right and always right and too good, smart or superior to be open and hardworking. They are people who may not want to learn a new and better way of doing something, or people who use the data to prove that their own ideas and methodology is hands-down the best way with no exceptions. The rest of us, may not be as intelligent, but we are better leaders.
  4. It’s clear that being open and curious makes one more receptive to change and therefore better learners. But being open to all change and all learnings every time, all the time is going overboard. That’s like being a flag in the wind. It’s what my friend from Colombia calls an ‘Eggplant‘ – someone who takes on the flavor of the dish, without her/his own taste. You will need to be intelligent about what to integrate and how to implement changes. You need to work hard to make sure that the change is the right one, that the change will stick.
  5. In addition, it’s great to be hardworking, but being hard-working by itself is not sufficient, unless you also have intelligence and open. Consider the ‘Worker Bee‘. They are industrious working on someone else’s plan, without much thought, and without necessarily being open to a new way of doing something. This adds great value and has its place. There are times when what you need is mostly worker bees…
  6. Now to combine the qualities above. If you’re intelligent *and* open, but not necessarily hard-working, you’re a princess. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. It feels good to be smart and open and powerful and privileged. But sometimes, you also need to be hardworking.
  7. If you’re hard-working *and* intelligent, but not open, then you’re a ‘Steward‘ – someone who has learned from many past successes and works hard to maintain these successful processes and systems. The down-side is that sometimes, these best practices no longer apply. So people must be open to new ways of doing things when change happens.
  8. If you’re open *and* hardworking, but not being intelligent, then you’re a ‘Wanna-bee‘. Again, there’s nothing wrong with being that way. You’re open to others’ ideas and plans and work hard to implement them. But sometimes you have to be intelligent and courageous enough to speak up and provide feedback and input and ideas to the current plan. Leaders reach for that bar, at the appropriate time.
  9. The Leader brings all three together – the intelligence to understand opportunities and challenges, the openness to learn and integrate new information and circumstances, and the work ethic to make something happen, despite impossible odds.
  10. Nobody is always any one thing all the time. But I hope that this post helps you understand your current mindset and the mindset of those around you. So that we can reach more strategically, more consciously to be the Leader in each of us.

Communicate, Connect and Engage

January 22, 2019

FountainBlue’s January 18, 2019 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘ The Convergence of Technologies’.   

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We were fortunate to have such a range of leaders on our panel, representing a range of professional and educational backgrounds, a range of rows and companies. They shared a passion for the need to communicate, connect and engage, and agreed:

  • Solid Communication is core to all successful relationships, all successful projects. Communication must be open, transparent, authentic and clear, as well as bi-directional, direct and ongoing. This is generally not easy, but always required.
  • Connections between people help make communication easier, even when difficult topics must be broached. 
  • Successful engagement leads to improved communications, improved connections, and successful metrics. 
  • Improved communication and connections can also lead to improved engagement.

Below are some best practices for communicating, connecting and engaging with others:

  • Be Strategic
    • Look not just at the words and actions, but also be curious about the intentions and motivations of other parties.
    • Insist on civility, but reach for a true connection.
    • Consider your ecosystem of stakeholders and each audience within that stakeholder set. Strategize your communications and actions based on your research.
    • Focus on measuring the impact of your engagement programs.
  • Be Open
    • Be open and compassionate and curious, especially when someone looks and seems different than you, especially when she/he might disagree with you.
    • Be empathetic to others and their situations. Try to walk a mile in someone else’s shoes.
    • Be vulnerable and receptive. Others are more likely to communicate, connect and engage with you that way. 
    • Step outside your comfort zone.
  • Be Empathetic
    • Be aware of not just what you say but how you say it. 
    • How you make the other person feel is even more important than being right. (Maya Angelou)
    • Speak to the whole person. Others are just as complicated and complex as we are ourselves!
    • Build trust
    • Try to bring your best self forward at all times, but expect that this can’t happen all the time. Forgive yourself and others when you’re/they are not coming across as their best self.
  • Empower Others
    • Empower others to plan and strategize to improve communication, connection and engagement.
    • Inspire and empower others around you, no matter where you sit at the table, even if you don’t have a seat at the table.

In conclusion, our inspiring panelists shared a common message: Keep reaching for stars. Never settle. The impossible can only happen to those who truly believe it can.


Please join me in thanking our panelists for FountainBlue’s January 18, 2019 When She Speaks event on the topic of ‘ The Convergence of Technologies’, and our gracious hosts at Samsung.

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue 
  • Panelist Megan Cheek, HR Director, Maxim Integrated
  • Panelist Lucia Soares, Managing Director, Health247 Inc. 
  • Panelist Sarah Tapia, Director of Talent Acquisition, Samsung Research America
  • Panelist Erin Yeaman, Senior Director of HR, Lam Research
  • Panelist Julia Zhu, Engineering Program Manager, Cisco

with opening remarks by Joon Lee, President, Samsung Research America and closing remarks by Roxanne dos Santos, Senior Manager, HR Operations, Samsung Research America

See bios and details at https://www.tikkl.com/fountainblue/c/engage

DevOps Opportunities and Challenges

January 21, 2019

devops

FountainBlue’s January 18 VIP roundtable was on the topic of ‘DevOps Trends and Opportunities’. Please join me in thanking our executives in attendance and our gracious hosts at Techlab, and our investment partners at Vonzos. Below are notes from the conversation. 

Positioned at the intersection between R&D, QA and Operations, DevOps teams manage IT, engineering, product and business objectives, coordinate between multiple leaders and objectives and keep projects on track. This is no easy task as technology changes so quickly, solutions get increasingly more complex, and much more data is generated from a wider range of sources.

We were fortunate to have a wide range of perspectives around the table, with executives representing a wide range of companies and roles and company stages. We agreed that although medical and transportation and manufacturing companies might have little tolerance for errors, there may be more latitude for failures and breaches which might annoy customers, but not endanger them. Although of course, this is to be avoided. 

With the complexities for all DevOps teams across industries, it’s becoming more challenging to:

  • ensure compliance to security standards
  • document specification and other changes
  • proactively ensure security standards

Hence, it becomes much more important to communicate, coordinate, and collaborate on developer operations needs, and also fold in infrastructure and security elements. Below are some trends and best practices:

  • Move SW development from on-premises and into the cloud, where appropriate
  • Adopt Open source solutions 
  • Embrace Agile and fail-fast approaches to stay nimble – it’s more about sprints than marathons
  • Investigate using microservices  
  • Create dynamically generated reports help proactively manage mission-critical projects
  • Focus on the important data and information
  • Proactively lead and manage through change
  • Be disciplined and methodical about creating and following processes, about coordinating and communicating with other parties
  • Automate white-collar resources, but do regular sanity checks to ensure that the automations continue to make sense
  • Architect solutions well, make plans to scale
Below are examples of some DevOps opportunities ahead.
  • Over-the-Air (OTA) updating
  • Hardware and Software integration
  • Solutions which can respond more rapidly, more accurately to larger volumes of input from a larger range of sources
  • DevSecOps solutions (developer, security and operations)
  • Container security
  • Deep tech solutions – integrating AI, ML, IoT
  • Integrating digitalization trends into DevOps

With the successful running of DevOps teams, communication, coordination and collaboration converge, and technology becomes an enabler, allowing people, teams and companies to build tools and methodologies more quickly, more collaboratively, and more sustainably throughout a product life cycle in order to better to understand and deliver on (internal and external) customer needs. 

Hope for a Better World

January 1, 2019

HopeBetterWorld

As the last whispers of an eventful year wind down, reflect and make plans for the new year.

  1. Find commonalities with others and seek common goals.
  2. Put the needs of others in front of your own, if the greater good is served.
  3. Strive for continuous improvement, never settling for ‘good-enough’.
  4. Be grateful for what you have, rather than pining for all you wish you had.
  5. Be more curious than instructive, more open than judgmental.
  6. Forgive others for their perceived transgressions, but forgive yourself first.
  7. Embrace the uncomfortable as opportunities, the unknown as gifts.
  8. Rise above the details and focus on the intentions and the goals.
  9. Take pride in your own skills and talents, while also learning from all others.
  10. Have faith that your own hope for a better world becomes contagious.

Best wishes for a peaceful, fruitful, successful new year.

Convergence of Technologies

December 12, 2018

Dec7Panel

FountainBlue’s December 7 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘The Convergence of Technologies’.  

We were fortunate to have such a range of leaders on our panel, who were all able to blur the lines, shake up our thinking around both leadership and innovation! Although they represent a broad swath of backgrounds and industries, they have much in common:

  • They are passionate about continuous learning, in search of a greater self.
  • They embrace opportunities to stretch themselves, and accept that they can’t be perfect, but they can learn from every opportunity.
  • They are curious about technology, and its ability to solve the problems of the customer.

They agree that many factors are leading to the convergence of technologies, including:

  • the established global network and infrastructure and communication channels
  • the preponderance of technologies we count on every day, across teams, companies, industries, countries
  • the proliferation of data generated by hardware and software solutions
  • the empowered users who keep raising the bar for personalized solutions for their everyday problems

The challenges to tech leaders are immense as technologies converge.

  • How do you invent and innovate faster and better in less time, with higher quality?
  • How do you collaborate and innovate while retaining your IP and core value?
  • How do you apply successful solutions in one sector to another sector?

But there are opportunities ahead as technologies and solutions converge.

  • Embrace open source technologies which are standardized.
  • Build win-win collaborations with trusted partners.
  • Empower select partners and customers to help define their needs and potential solutions.
  • Leverage the volumes of data to manage your innovations and solutions.
  • Embrace ML, AI, IoT, Edge and other solutions – they are our future.
  • Wellness and health will be top-of-mind for customers of all sizes and needs. 

The following is advice from our esteemed panel on how to lead and innovate in these exciting times.

  • Have the confidence to keep reaching forward, the humility to know your value, the wisdom and self-awareness to listen to and integrate feedback and learnings.
  • Be a part of the solution, allowing more diverse perspectives, including your own, to be part of the critical conversations which will define the future of a program/product/solution.
  • Know and embrace who you are, where you fit in as technologies converge. Have confident that leaders will be needed as robots/machines/software/hardware can’t run the world on its own.
  • Respect the data, but look for the implications of that data, and the actions and decisions which should take place based on that report.
  • Know your boundaries and enforce those boundaries so that you can stay on course for being the type of leader you want to be.
  • Own your destiny. Know how your choices will support your own health and welfare – a necessary and foundational part of making that difference.

The bottom line is that it takes a village of leaders and innovators to perpetuate this convergence of technologies. Be part of the solution!


Please join us in thanking our panelists for FountainBlue’s December 7 When She Speaks event, on the topic of ‘The Convergence of Technologies,’ and our generous hosts at Flex. 

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue 
  • Panelist Gayathri Badrinath, Digital Health Entrepreneur and former Head of Global Marketing Services, Siemens Healthineers
  • Panelist Katherine Brown, Director of Manufacturing Engineering, Lam Research
  • Panelist Karthi Gopalan, Product Line Director, Mobile Power BU, Maxim Integrated
  • Panelist Sabitha Krishnamurthy, Director of Software Development, Enterprise Business Unit, Cisco
  • Panelist Mahsa Nakhjiri, Sr. Director Connectivity Center of Excellence, Innovation Technology & Integration, Flex
  • with opening remarks provided by Suruchi Sharma, VP of Corporate Strategy, Flex

See bios and details at https://www.tikkl.com/fountainblue/c/convergence